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bakersfield, leaving harvard to go work in mississippi is -- >> bill moyers: you left before you finished your studies? >> marshall ganz: yeah, i had a year to go.
: smiting goliath might as well be marshall ganz's job description. it began in mississippi's freedom summer of 1964 when his fury against injustice pulled him out of harvard and into the struggle for civil rights. from there, he signed on with the legendary cesar chavez and the united farm workers and for 16 years, struggled to unionize the men and women in the fields of california who toiled endless hours and mounting days, picking crops for next to nothing. three decades after marshall ganz had dropped out of harvard, he went back to finish his degree and earn a doctorate. a few years later, he was asked to become the architect behind the obama campaign's skillful organizing of students and volunteers. today, marshall ganz is a founder of the leading change network, a global community of organizers, educators and researchers mobilizing for democracy. you'll find more of his experience and philosophy in this book, "why david sometimes wins" marshall ganz, it's good to meet you. >> marshall ganz: it's good to meet you, bill. >> bill moyers: stories have been a powerful part of your life. wh
: immigration reform. shirley barbara says that this makes good sense. the mississippi governor says it makes good economic sense as well. the governor is here to explain why republicans are embracing something that is flawed, but better than getting nothing done at all. reading what you're trying to do here, it sounded a lot like the position that president obama has. better that than nothing. is that right? >> welcome i don't know the president obama will admit that what we've got is a total failure. the worst thing we can do is nothing. because the current system will just give us more of the same. more legal immigrants. it is the equivalent of amnesty. the senate has passed a big comprehensive bill that i think advances the ball down the field from. but i think it is a long way from perfect. and republicans in the house have the opportunity to take that as a starting point and give us a really first-rate immigration reform that will get control of the borders seriously. that will surely enforce the people who have visas to come here, that we make sure that they we when they are supposed t
, deep south, mississippi, wisdom. red states say caramel. >> i see illinois is a faded pink. >> right along the mississippi. depends on where you grew up. no right way. it has to do with local dialect. >> i figured it was a northern vs. southern. >> i have more maps. here is your next map, part of the country all in map referring to "sub" saying getting a sandwich and in the other part they call it a "hoaggie." >> that's right. >> next one, this is the difference between soda or pop. >> i know this one. >> in red include here in d.c. and dmv, we call it "soda." blue they call it "pop" and green they refer to it by the soda's name, coke or rc cola. >> drink. >> you would never specify? >> that is what i remember down south. >> that could mean a lot of things. >> all right. this is, again american dialect, all the states in red when they are talking about a group of people, you all. what do the folks in green states say? >> you all is proper. >> how do you say it, wisdom? >> y'all. >> it depends where you came from. >> detroit an detroit? >> there are a whole bunch of maps. go to myfoxd
found himself biking to his miserable job in mississippi he felt real despair. from recognized he was 47 years old and never had a car and afford for 20 years in prison. sometimes he says it's little things like that that can drag him down into sorrow. he chose to do something that both keep those wasted years fresh in his memory. he helps to educate others in the hopes that his story will spur reform. he's not an educated man. his formal schooling stopped in 6th grade. the katrina criminal justice reform effort. that's the holistic reentry program for offenders. he told anybody with time to spare and inclination to listen. putting a face on an abstract idea, injustice. on this particular afternoon in may 2012, he tells this story to me for a fourth time. he is deeply preoccupied with a judge who denied his case for years. who also heard his murder case in 1976. the month he was released the judge died. greg goes to his house to get his tattered obituary he's read many times. the obituary says nice things. the judge may have been a goodman, greg muses, he might have been a good husband,
out of gulf port, mississippi. 6 inches of rain leaving some people surrounded waist deep in water. >> it didn't get that heavy during katrina. >> the high waters stranded drivers. nothing like that here. you do say changes are coming? >> yes. >>> we have some dense fog out there, an advisory until 10:00. the areas of fog will start to dissipate around 9:00 this morning. that's going to leave us with lots of sunshine in the forecast. high pressure is going to build in through the day, do its thing. you can see this stationary front. the focal point of the showers, you can see that just off the coast of the carolinas right now. we will continue to stay dry towards tomorrow and that's when the change moves in. seasonal this morning. we should be at 65 degrees for the time of the year. that's what we're getting in glen burnie this morning. 64 mount eerie and 64 northville, mar dell springs at 63 degrees. fortunately we don't need the rain so that's good news that it's not picking up on a lot for today or even tomorrow. then we will start to see changes coming for the end of the week a
to go back. all of that plus breaking news. there was a miracle today in oxford, mississippi. reinforced with scratch- resistant glass and a unibody made kevlar strong. okay google now. call my droid. the new droid ultra by motorola. when strength matters, droid does. ♪ the joint is jumpin' osteo bi-flex® helps strengthen your joints.° like calcium supplements can help your bones, osteo bi-flex can help your joints.° osteo bi-flex... the best stuff in the joint.™ now in joint and muscle formula. >> shepard: u.s. senator ted cruz says nothing against canada but is he an american. he was indeed born in canada but his mother is a u.s. citizen. he says he actually has dual citizenship both countries. now he plans to give up the canadian citizenship. senator cruz recently won a straw poll of 2016 conservative denver. made two trips to iowa. home of the nation's first in the nation presidential contest and staffers say this week is he planning to visit new hampshire. the first primary state san diego mayor bob filner is trying to settle a sexual harassment lawsuit against him from the c
in mississippi. >> guyot: people talked about his being from mississippi, being poor. >> his mother was a teenaged bride. they picked cotton, they worked the land. that's a hard living. >> barry: and i grew up dirt, dirt, dirt, dirt poor. did all kind of odd jobs, you know, hustling pop bottles. back in the day you could get old rags and sell them too. >> guyot: people talked about his lifting himself up by his bootstraps and... >> reporter: you were an eagle scout, you were a member of the national honor society, you played varsity basketball, you received a masters in chemistry, you were on your way to a doctorate and then you shifted gears. >> barry: i think that movement was the catalyst and the lightning rod for the country, and i'm proud to have been a part of it. >> guyot: his civil rights work resonated with people that a lot of other things wouldn't have resonated with. >> johnson: he had instant credibility. as well he should have. >> effi: i don't know if i should say it, but we were living together, i said, "well, what are we going to do? i mean, you know, you can't be l
en mississippi muchos han quedado atrapado en las inundaciones causada por fuertes lluvias, el wa agua dejo ba radio los vehÍculos. y los ocupantes tuvieron que abrirse paso en las calles para escapar la inundaciÓn. y lo peor, escuche bien, que seguirÁ lloviendo. mientras, al otro extremo en este lado de la costa oeste. hemos estado con temperaturas casi bordeando el rango de los 80 grados. por el momento vientos leves, del oeste suroeste a razÓn de 10 millas por hospital? y el sur del paÍs, san antonio, en dallas en el centro del paÍs, experimentando temperaturas en los 90 grados y a pesar que ustedes en chicago, desde chicago hasta new york, estuvieron sintiendo temperaturas agradables. todo esto seÑores, va a ser cosa del pasado, nuevamente viene una ola de calor que se estarÁ sintiendo a mitad de semana. y rÁpidamente vamos a territorio mexicano, en ciudad mÉxico, 22 centÍgrados. durango 27 centÍgrados y ustedes inician las temperaturas cÁlidas. en el atlÁntico gracias a dios cruzando los dedos, todo tranquilo, no es el caso en el sureste, como les comentÉ y mos
with a dollop of daisy. ♪ do a dollop of daisy >>> take a look at the scene in gulfport, mississippi. a storm hit during a church service. and so much rain fell so fast, that worshipers became stranded inside of their church. about six inches of rain fell in about two hours. the only time the flooding there was worse was during hurricane katrina. >> and wearing the sunday best. >>> all right. let's take a look at the road conditions. it will be wet along the gulf coast and in the southeast again today. flooding is possible there once again. and rain also could make things difficult for parts of the southwest and the rockies. >> staying in the southwest. if you're flying, it won't be any surprise there will be some delays there. also in the southeast, in atlanta, charlotte and new orleans. >>> new details this morning of a fiery incident on a los angeles freeway that involved actor dick van dyke. >> home video shows the 87-year-old actor's late model jaguar charred after it somehow caught fire and then exploded. abc's gio benitez has the story. >> "the dick van dyke show." >> reporter: he's th
much water. flood warnings are posted from florida to the carolinas. mississippi is trying to dry out after getting drenched with six inches of rain on sunday. in hard-hit gulfport, members of one church were stranded for hours. some say the flooding was worse than hurricane katrina. meteorologist craig setzer tells us whether there's going to be a break in these dangerous conditions. >> much of the region has seen one extreme of weather to the area. parts too wet. parts too dry. the reason, the jet stream taking a very unusually large dip through eastern parts of the country that's causing rain in the southeast and dry conditions in the west. this type of pattern usually doesn't move a whole lot. more hot and dry weather expected in the northern rockies and the pacific northwest. so know relief for the wildfires there. and moisture continues to come up out of the caribbean and gulf of mexico. flooding is once again possible for parts of florida, as well as georgia, alabama and on to the carolinas. now because the pattern is so large in amplitude, big ridges and big dips in the jet st
percent. only mississippi had a decline from 9 percent down to 8.5 percent. unemployment fell in 8 states and was unchanged in 14 states. in seattle considering raising their minimum wage to $15 an hour. the state has the heist minimum rate at $9.19 an hour. the mayoral candidates say they will consider this. it may make it more difficult for major rekalers to operate there. wal-mart refused to accept a decision to raise minimum wage to 12.50 an hour. according to a british survey the average officer suffered death raids twice a day computer crashes and rude clients and computer failure. >> the survey found 51 percent of friends experience serial work with aaroning not having a proper time for lunch. they get stressed out over technology malfunctions not surprisingly 42 percent of workers are most wound up and i am patie impatient on a monday. good news, guys, today is tuesday. >>> are you guilty of your own desk rage? tweet us at fox frien foxfriendsfirst@foxnews.com and let us know. >>> it is 10 minutes after the top of the hour. coming up they are supposed to catch you or me if you bre
mississippi. that is not good news for >>> over the weekend. manuel bojorquez is in gulf port, mississippi. manuel good morning to you. >> . >> reporter: good morning to our viewers out west. the threat remains to the florida panhandle. with the ground saturated, residents are keeping a watchful eye on the gulf. they are concerned about what a tropical storm or hurricane this season could mean. like much of the southeast, gulf port has been pounded by record rainfall, getting nearly 5 inches in 2 hours at one point. that caught people off guard. twenty-two streets here were flooded. downtown businesses are cleaning up from as much as 18 inches of water now, of course, gulf port and the gulf coast are no strangers to heavy rainfall; but residents here say the recent storms flooded parts of the city that didn't flood during hurricane katrina back in 2005. charlie and gale? . >> manuel thanks. >> if police officers arrest you, do they have the right to search your smartphone. the obama administration believes the answer is yes. however two federal courts disagree. now the white house wants t
llamas en medio de las altas temperaturas. en mississippi muchos quedaron atrapados en las inundaciones causadas por las fuertes lluvias, el agua dejÓ varados a muchos vehÍculos. lo peor es que seguirÁ lloviendo, mientras al otro extremo, en este lado de la costa oeste asÍ hemos estado, temperaturas en el rango de los 80. vientos leves del oeste a razÓn de 10 millas. el sur del paÍses, san antonio, dallas, experimentando temperaturas en 90 grados. desde chicago a nueva york temperaturas agradables, todo eso serÁ cosa del pasado porque viene una ola de calor. y rÁpidamente nos vamos hacia territorio mexicano, durango 27 centÍgrados. asÍ inician con temperaturas cÁlidas. y eso sÍ. en el atlÁntico todo esta bastante tranquilo, aunque no es el caso en el sureste como les comente, va a continuar lloviendo. una mejorÍa finalizando esta semana. y vamos al sureste de california, continÚan fuertes vientos hacia el interior en el dÍa de hoy hasta maÑana, no se descarta la posibilidad de condiciones severas. panorama lluvioso hacia el sureste, ustedes en el sur de la florida van a
the gulf coast and florida panhandle all the way into south carolina. gulfport, mississippi, the floodwaters receding there but with more rain in the forecast they may rise yet again. tracking it all for us is chad myers. ha is the latest, chad? >> anderson, when you have a stationary front, like a stationary bike, things don't move. you can pedal that bike all you want, it is not going anywhere. these storms aren't going anywhere. so what is raining now was raining an hour ago and what was raining this weekend is pretty much still raining at this point. look at these five-day rainfall totals. this is from friday afternoon to now. 12.5 inches in florida thachlt is a beach. not much of a beach vacation. panama city, popular place, ten inches of rainfall over the weekend. everywhere that you see red, that's six inches. at purple higher than that, and the ten-inch bulls eyes, macon, georgia, has 24 more inches on ground than they should have. so when it rains, it floods. there's no place for the water to soak in. it's been like that for days and days and days and the rain conti
some time with senator eastland fromto mississippi and ted kennedy said dick russell. dithe fact is, you learned within your own party caucus how to deal with people with whom you fundamentally disagreed, and that in turn was great preparation for the larger senate and indeed the larger body politics. th that's gone. we now have a rigidly -conservative and rigidly liberal party. >> what about you look a lot at political engagement and civic actionht. how did that change and how does -does that fit into the kind of -that we're talking about here in washington. we're talking about here in washington. here atable, as they wouldble, as they w say in the senate, my friends here my distinguished friends and colleagues. i think they're absolutely righto make s that we want to make sense of -what's happening now the moment to look back to when a lot of these things against change ise is the 60's and 70's and that was a moment when many people on the right and on the left looked at what they would have described as the washington establ
and freedom. working in mississippi delta, it was lonely. you against the sheriff sometimes by yourself and a handful of people registered to vote. it was a way to reenforce our beliefs this could happen in america. we never dreamed we would have an african-american president. even the district of columbia being elected officials. d.c. officials were appointed by the government. they didn't vote for mayor, city council, any of those things. the march changed washington and america for the better. >> thing that struck me, power of not feeling alone. >> a absolutely. in america, you need help. you have to convince a bunch of people whatever you believe in is important so they can help you make the change. that is what march in washington represented. from that we get '64 -- civil rights act and '65 voting rights act. as a result of this march, march on washington then montgomery march. >> i want you to speak about the importance of children and being part of the march? >> first time i went to jail i was a young man. i am pleased to say i am bringing three of my grandchildren with me. they
problems. this hatch -- this happened on sunday engulf port, mississippi. storm hit during a church service. the rain fell so much worshippers became stranded in the church. 6 inches of rain falling in two hours there. the bishop says the property has drainage problems. only time the flooding was worse was during hurricane katrina. whoa. my. likely to be more flooding there today. there will also be heavy rain across the southeast into the mid-atlantic states. clear in the northeast across the midwest and plains. showers in the southwest and rockies. >> 97 degrees in denver. colorado springs. warming up in new york. haven't seen 86 here in weeks. 76, seattle. 90 minneapolis. miami. 109 degrees of dry, pizza oven heat in phoenix. >> the pet population at the white house is increasing by one. the first family has welcomed a second dog. her name is sunny, a portuguese water dog. >> same breed as bo, the obama's first dog. the white house says -- the breed works well for the obamas because of family allergies. sunny is entirely black, bo has a couple white spots down the middle and on paws. as
to punish the wrongdoing that occurred. we think next month it will be clear that mississippi and louisiana, in particular, have been dramatically impacted. these duties are warranted to offset the subsidies. ashley: the major buyers of the imported shrimp say we are talking about two different products. what comes in from asia is so far shrimp. is there a distinction there question. >> our shrimp are caught in the gulf of mexico. they are not farm raised. consumers look at them side-by-side. they make a determination on what the prices. though foreign shrimp are less expensive because they are being some guys. ashley: for us, the consumers, and i love my shrimp, does this mean the prices could go up if the tariffs are approved? >> i do not think they will go up. right now there has been some problems in the shipping industry worldwide. it is affecting the quality and the health of the shrimp that is coming in from foreign countries. our domestically caught shrimp are in great shape. we have proven that since the oil spill. all of which have been found to be of the highest-quality. ashley:
into mississippi, it was pretty horrible. it was not all blamed on sherman. it was the collapse of the cotton market. the english went to india, egypt for cotton the last few years of the blockade, it broke them. 6000 union soldiers elected to settle in new orleans. it was not all like "gone with the wind." it was coming back, but it was a different culture. it would not be agricultural. it would not have that until later in the 19th century. host: the north was in the midst of a great big industrial revolution. the days of the big financiers on wall street. tell us about what was happening there. guest: thanks in part to the machinery of war. guest: it was a continuation of the war and an expansion, and they were getting ready for the centennial of the nation and showing off the advances that had been made in the past 100 years. most of those were technological advances, the old farming equipment to the new modern technology, transcontinental railroad, transportation was bringing people closer together, making it much easier to get cross-country. host: here are a few of the big things that h
, they essentially came the storm troopers of the movement. able to the mississippi delta were other organizations were afraid to go. certainly her. fannie lou hamer after the mississippi delta, sharecropping family, ma who, by her own account, by report went to school only one day, created, in her entire life. i would are used by one of the most eloquent spokespersons for the aims of the movement. a speech that she gave at the democratic national convention in 1964, you can you do it. if you have not heard it, here it. because it is the most eloquent statement that i have heard, courageous woman and is deathly her paper think if we move from a national level to the local level, the list grows and grows. one of, i was the one of the most exciting things about being sort of doing this history, being involved in a scholarly production of literacy about the civil rights movement is about a lot of really good stuff that is coming out that's talked about his local activists, were anonymous for the most part but without them he would not affect a national movement. and i think it was to go back to the p
in mississippi a couple of miles from the state penitentiary, they have a program that allows prisoners to leave and make $6 per hour processing chickens. they said they have never had a prisoner last more than two days cleaning chickens. that they would rather be in their cells in prison than work in the chicken processing plant because it is such hard, dirty, nasty work. we are seeing the same thing in arizona. picking lettuce, there are no american workers lining up to do those jobs. host of this tweet -- -- host: this tweet -- guest: if there were? oh, well, a secret about immigration, if you wanted to come to the united states and clean a hotel room or work in a service sector that is not agriculture, there is no way for you to come to this country to work. there is especially no way for you to stay. we do not have a visa category that addresses these people. while we do have an agriculture program, it is small and difficult to use and many employers do not use it. in california they say that 70% of agriculture workers are here illegally and only 4% of the total population are using the h2a
above mississippi. >>> and apple co-founder steve wozniak offering his review of "jobs" with ashton kutchers ahis former partner. steve likes ashton better in "that '70s show" let's just say. >>> futures lower after the longest losing streak since december for stocks. the dow down for four consecutive trading days losing 440 points. >>> the irs sent out letters to 20,000 small business owners over the past year notifying them of possible income underreporting. the irs thinks businesses that get most of their sales through credit cards may be underreporting their cash transactions. cnn money has a list of places where homes are the most affordable and your income goes the farthest. top, altemon springs, florida. >> we norman hat tan. we had red flag warnings in the area, talking about strong winds and dry lightning, eventually we'll get more moisture and see rain hit the ground and that will bring relief toward the second half of the week but it will take some time. >>> rain, way too much of it, in the southeast, one to two inches of rain still possible, three to four inches possible
processing plant in mississippi a couple of miles from the state penitentiary, they have a program that allows prisoners to leave and make $6 per hour processing chickens. they said they have never had a prisoner last more than two days cleaning chickens. that they would rather be in their cells in prison than work in the chicken processing plant because it is such hard, dirty, nasty work. we are seeing the same thing in arizona. picking lettuce, there are no american workers lining up to do those jobs. host: a couple more tweets -- guest: if there were? oh, well, a dirtly littlesecret about immigration, if you wanted to come to the united states and clean a hotel room or work in a service sector that is not agriculture, there is no way for you to come to this country to work. there is especially no way for you to stay. we do not have a visa category that addresses these people. while we do have an agriculture program, it is small and difficult to use and many employers do not use it. in california they say that 70% of agriculture workers are here illegally and only 4% of the total
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)

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